is the French equivalent of , but it is thicker, richer and much more versatile. It is only slightly sour, so works well in both sweet and savoury dishes but can replace in most . splits when heated to a high temperature, but , like double/ can be left to boil without splitting (unless it is low-fat …) so it is a great addition to sauces and soups. I regularly substitute for sour cream, , yoghurt and even mayonnaise! It has a pleasant buttery, tangy taste but if I am making a dessert I often add a little sugar and some homemade vanilla extract to make it even more special.

Traditionally, Crème fraîche was made by fermenting unpasteurized cream and in France it still is, but in Australia and the USA milk products must be pasteurized so the lactic acid bacteria needs to be added back in.  It’s not quite the same as the French stuff, made from raw milk and specific naturally occurring bacteria strains, but is still delicious. I make mine by separating the cream from milk, then adding homemade buttermilk and leaving to stand for a day at room temperature. If I want a little extra tanginess, I add a couple of teaspoons of lemon juice to the mix. The same bacteria that thickens the cream produces an acidic environment that extends the shelf life so that Crème fraîche can last up to 2 weeks in the fridge.

Uses

Here are some of my favourite uses for Crème fraîche

  • Scrambled eggs
  • Omelette
  • Tartin
  • Gratin
  • Added to soup
  • Topping for fruit and berries
  • Salad dressing
  • Mashed potato
  • Spread for crackers
  • Creamy sauces
  • Pancake topping
  • Filling for a baked potato
  • Frosting
  • Ice Cream/Sorbet
  • Pie/quiche filling
  • Curry
  • Dip

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons (you can use homemade see recipe here)
  • 1 Pint of double/heavy cream (ideally not ultra pasteurized which will work but takes more time)
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice (optional – use if you prefer a more tangy flavour)

 

Equipment

  • Jar
  • Elastic band, string or can ring
  • Dishtowel/ clean piece of cloth

 

Method 

Step 1. Clean the jar with hot soapy water

Step 2. Place buttermilk and cream in quart sized jar

Step 3. Stir or shake to thoroughly mix the cream and buttermilk

Step 4. Cover with a clean dishtowel or piece of clean cloth and secure tightly with rubber band, string or can ring

Step 5. Keep covered and leave to sit for 12-24 hours at room temperature. The longer you let it ferment, the more sour it will be

Step 6. Once ready, place the lid on the jar and move to the fridge, where it will keep for about 2 weeks

Note: Consistency will vary with time left to stand, temperature, in the buttermilk used etc. If it is too thin, strain with a coffee filter. If it is too thick add some buttermilk.


Crème Fraîche
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Very simple recipe to make Crème Fraîche
Author:
Serves: 1 pint
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons Buttermilk
  • 1 Pint of double/heavy cream (ideally not ultra-pasteurized which will work but takes more time)
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice (optional - use if you prefer a more tangy flavour)
  • Equipment
  • Jar
  • Elastic band, string or can ring
  • Dishtowel/ clean piece of cloth
Instructions
  1. Clean the jar with hot soapy water
  2. Place buttermilk and cream in quart sized jar
  3. Stir or shake to thoroughly mix the cream and buttermilk
  4. Cover with a clean dishtowel or piece of clean cloth and secure tightly with rubber band, string or can ring
  5. Keep covered and leave to sit for 12-24 hours at room temperature. The longer you let it ferment, the more sour it will be
  6. Once ready, place the lid on the jar and move to the fridge, where it will keep for about 2 weeks.
Notes
Consistency will vary with time left to stand, temperature, culture in the buttermilk used etc. If it is too thin, strain with a coffee filter. If it is too thick add some buttermilk.

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