is one of those ingredients that suddenly pops up in a recipe…and you can absolutely guarantee you don’t have any on hand. One option is to substitute lemon juice/vinegar (4 tablespoons) for mixed with (1 cup) that has been left to stand for  about 15 minutes. It does the job but doesn’t taste the same.  Real is the liquid left over when you make from soured cream. In times gone by farmers stored milk for several days to make , so by the time it was churned it was slightly sour and made an acidic buttermilk perfect for baking. These days most people make from fresh cream so the buttermilk produced does not have the acidic component needed to neutralise the unpleasant flavour of baking soda. I make cultured , which produces acidic buttermilk (see how to here). But what if you don’t want to make butter? No problem, you can make the equivalent of shop-bought buttermilk, by culturing milk. All you need to start a continuous supply of buttermilk is milk and a carton of cultured buttermilk for the first batch, subsequent batches you can use your own buttermilk.  It is ridiculously easy to make and the best part is that each batch lasts about a month in the fridge.

Uses for Buttermilk

Buttermilk may be used in a recipe either for its flavour or to act as a liquid acidic component for use with baking soda. Here are some of my favourite ways to use homemade buttermilk:

  • Drinking straight
  • Smoothies
  • Waffles
  • Buttermilk Pancakes
  • Biscuits
  • Cakes
  • Cobbler
  • Scones
  • Soda Bread
  • Pana Cotta
  • Casseroles
  • Creamy salad dressing (e.g. Ranch)
  • Buttermilk mashed potato
  • Making Creme Fraiche

Ingredients

  • 63ml buttermilk (commercial buttermilk that says “live ” or ‘cultured)
  • 1-litre milk*

* I recommend either using pasteurised milk or pasteurising the raw milk yourself. You can do this by heating raw milk to 72°C and holding at that temperature for at least 15 seconds then cooling to room temperature.  Avoid ultra-pasteurized milk if possible, it works but takes a lot longer. The fat content of the milk does not affect the process, but a full fat milk leads to a richer, creamier product.

Equipment

  • Quart sized Jar
  • Elastic band, string or can ring
  • Clean tea towel or cloth

Method

Step 1. Thoroughly wash the jar with hot soapy water

Step 2. Pour buttermilk and milk into the jar

Step 3. Stir or shake to mix the liquids

Step 4. Cover with a clean dishtowel/piece of cloth then secure tightly with rubber band, string or can ring

Step 5. Keep covered and leave to sit for 12-24 hours at room temperature. The longer you let it ferment, the sourer it will be, but it is ready once it thickens.

Step 6. Once ready, place the lid on the jar and move to the fridge, where it keeps for about a month.

Step 7. For the next batch, simply reserve 63ml of the homemade buttermilk and repeat the process.

Buttermilk
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Make a continuous supply of buttermilk so that you always have some on hand. Each batch lasts one month.
Author:
Serves: 1 litre
Ingredients
  • 63ml buttermilk (commercial buttermilk that says "live culture" or 'cultured)
  • 1-litre milk
  • Equipment
  • Quart sized Jar
  • Elastic band, string or can ring
  • Clean tea towel or cloth
Instructions
  1. Thoroughly wash the jar with hot soapy water
  2. Pour buttermilk and milk into the jar
  3. Stir or shake to mix the liquid
  4. Cover with a clean dishtowel/piece of cloth then secure tightly with rubber band, string or can ring
  5. Keep covered and leave to sit for 12-24 hours at room temperature. The longer you let it ferment, the sourer it will be, but it is ready once it thickens.
  6. Once ready, place the lid on the jar and move to the fridge, where it keeps for about a month.
  7. For the next batch, simply reserve 63ml of the homemade buttermilk and repeat the process.

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