, is a fermented, spicy coleslaw that is colourful, tangy and tastes absolutely delicious. It is the Salvadorian equivalent of Sauerkraut and is traditionally eaten with Pupusa’s, a kind of corn tortilla stuffed with cheese, beans or meat. I love it with layered over cheese in sandwiches, on the side of a salad, stuffed in a jacket potato with lashings of butter or just heaped on a spoon straight from the jar. I first discovered in Sally Fallon’s book ‘Nourishing Traditions’ and immediately wanted to give it a try. I love Sauerkraut, but a spicy version with carrots, onions, chilli and oregano sounded even better! I have adapted the original recipe/methods over time with inspiration from other sources. The original recipe, suggests a 3-day ferment, but after reading an excellent blog  ‘Bustin the myth of the 3 day kraut‘ over at “Nourishing Treasures” I switched to four-week ferments for all my .  The extra time not only increases the Curtido’s probiotic goodness but in my opinion also seriously improves the taste. I also skip the whey, preferring to use only salt in my vegetable ferments to encourage natural bacteria from the to do the work.

How to Make Curtido

I make three-litre batches, but I eat a lot of this stuff! If you don’t think you can eat this amount or you have a large family and don’t think this will be enough, just scale up or down accordingly.

Equipment*

– 3 Litre Fido Jar*

– Sharp knife and chopping board

– Food processor with shredder (optional)

– Meat tenderizer

– Large Bowls

– Tea towels or other clean cloth for covering bowls

* You can also use jars with airlocks, mason jars with weights and other vessels suitable for anaerobic , but I find I have good and consistent results with Fido’s and they have the big advantage that they are fairly cheap! I bought mine here

Ingredients for 3 litres of Curtido

– 1 kg Red Cabbage

– 1 kg White cabbage

– 550g carrot

– 400g Red Onion (or mix of red and white depending what you have on hand)

– 2 tbsp. Oregano

– 2 tsp. Chilli flakes (or more to taste. I tend to use a LOT more, but admittedly I am a chilli fanatic…)

– 4 tbsp. sea salt (for vegetables I use approximately 1 tablespoon per 750g of shredded veg)

Method

Step 1. Wash all equipment and your hands thoroughly before you begin.

Step 2. Remove cores and outside leaves from cabbage and peel and trim carrots and onions

Step 3. Finely shred the vegetables using a food processor or by finely slicing by hand with a knife. I use my Little Dutch Maid hand crank food processor with vegetable shredding attachment, which thankfully makes this job very quick and easy.

Step 4. Once all of the vegetables are shredded, place in a large bowl (or two), then add the chilli, oregano and salt before mixing together well with clean hands.

Step 5. Cover the bowl and leave for 30 minutes

Step 6. Fill your jar and tamp down the contents with a meat tenderizer to pack in as much as possible

Step 7. Cover jar and bowl then leave for another 30 minutes. Pack in remaining mixture and tamp down again until the cabbage is tightly packed and submerged at least 1.5 cm beneath the liquid from the vegetables. If it still does not fit or you do not have enough liquid, try again in another 30 minutes (although I have never found any additional time to be necessary).

Step 8. Store in a cool (preferably less than 23° C), dark place and leave for 4 weeks. I am a bit obsessed with so have a large cupboard with shelves for all of my ferments, but the bottom of your wardrobe would do. I place the jar on a plate or bowl for the first few days to catch any liquid that fizzes out of the jar.

After 4 weeks, the Curtido is ready to eat. Ideally, it should be crunchy and colourful with a vinegary tang. If the Curtido smells bad, smells of alcohol, has visible mould or fuzz, something has gone wrong and it is best to throw it away and start again.


Curtido
 
Curtido is a fermented, spicy coleslaw that is colourful, tangy and tastes absolutely delicious It's the Salvadorian equivalent of Sauerkraut, and is made from cabbage, carrots, onion chilli and Oregano.
Author:
Recipe type: Fermented Vegetables
Cuisine: Central American
Ingredients
  • 1 kg Red Cabbage
  • 1 kg White cabbage
  • 550 g carrot
  • 400g Red Onion
  • 2 tbsp. Oregano
  • 2 tsp. Chilli flakes (or more to taste)
  • 4 tbsp. salt (1 tablespoon salt per 750g shredded veg)
Instructions
  1. Wash all equipment and your hands thoroughly before you begin.
  2. Remove cores and outside leaves from cabbage and peel and trim carrots and onions.
  3. Finely shred the vegetables using a food processor or by finely slicing by hand with a knife.
  4. Once all of the vegetables are shredded, place in a large bowl (or two), then add the chilli, oregano and salt before mixing together well with clean hands
  5. Cover the bowl and leave for 30 minutes
  6. Fill your jar and tamp down the contents with a meat tenderizer to pack in as much as possible
  7. Cover jar and bowl then leave for another 30 minutes. Pack in remaining mixture and tamp down again until the cabbage is tightly packed and submerged at least 1.5 cm beneath the liquid from the vegetables. If it still does not fit or you do not have enough liquid, try again in another 30 minutes
  8. Store in a cool (preferably less than 23° C), dark place and leave for 4 weeks. Place the jar on a plate or bowl for the first few days to catch any liquid that fizzes out of the jar
  9. After 4 weeks, the Curtido is ready to eat. Ideally it should be crunchy and colourful with a vinegary tang. If the Curtido smells bad, smells of alcohol, has visible mould or fuzz, something has gone wrong and it is best to throw it away and start again

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